Minuteman Review Guide to Glocks: What Do All Those Numbers Mean?

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Last Updated on May 13, 2021.

Writer for Minuteman Review, handgun aficionado and artisan firearms reviewer. 

Minuteman Review Guide to Glocks What Do All Those Numbers Mean

All Glocks are well-known for being reliable, easy to use and maintain, and fairly-priced handguns. However, remembering every model number can be challenging at times.

Use this guide to make sense of the Glock pistol roster and learn which model numbers correspond to what models.

The Glock Pistol Naming Nomenclature

Starting with the first Glock pistol, the Glock 17 or G17, all subsequent Glock pistols have followed the same pattern: the manufacturer’s name, followed by a two-digit number.

Sometimes, you may find specific model names with a letter suffix (such as C or MOS) or a Generation designation (e.g., Gen4).

In general, the naming system denotes the following:

  • Model number: Each number corresponds to a specific Glock type.
  • Letter suffix: Denotes a sub-variant of a specific model number with a particular feature, such as a compensated barrel, a long slide, or compatibility with pistol red dot sights.
  • Generation marking: Applies to Generation 4 and 5 models only. Denotes that this pistol is part of a particular Generation’s lineup and possesses its unique features. Gen 3 and earlier do not possess a Generation marking.


Complete Guide to Glock Pistol Models

Learn about all of the Glock types ever produced so you can distinguish between each model number and corresponding subvariants.

9x19mm

Glock 17: 

Full-size, double-stack 9x19mm pistol featuring a 17-round magazine. The G17 is the original Glock pistol.

  • G17C: Compensated version, featuring a ported slide and barrel.
  • G17L: Long-slide model, featuring a 6.02” barrel.
  • G17 MOS: Features a cut slide for red dot sights.
  • P80 Classic Edition: Commemorative edition of the Glock 17 emulating the look and feel of the early-model G17 as adopted by the Austrian Army in 1982, before its arrival on the US market. The “P80” name comes from the Austrian military designation for the Glock 17: Pistole 80.

Glock 18: 

Machine pistol version of the Glock 17, restricted to law enforcement and military only.

  • G18C: Compensated version, featuring a ported slide and barrel.

Glock 19: 

Compact, double-stack 9x19mm pistol featuring a 15-round magazine. It can also accept G17 magazines.

  • G19C: Compensated version, featuring a ported slide and barrel.
  • G19 MOS: Features a cut slide for red dot sights.
  • G19X: Crossover model, featuring a full-size grip mated to a G19’s slide and barrel. It does not accept standard G19 magazines; you need G17 magazines or longer.

    Glock 26:

Subcompact, double-stack 9x19mm pistol featuring a 10-round magazine. It can also accept G19 and G26 magazines.

  • G26 MOS: Features a cut slide for red dot sights.

    Glock 34: 

Competition version of the G17, featuring a 5.31” barrel.

  • G34 MOS: G34 with a cut slide for red dot sights.

Glock 43: 

Subcompact, single-stack “Slimline” 9x19mm pistol featuring a proprietary 6-round magazine.

  • G43X: Crossover model, featuring a compact-length grip mated to a G43’s slide and barrel. The G43X is compatible with a proprietary 10-round magazine also used by the G48.
  • G43X MOS: G43X with a cut slide for red dot sights.

Glock 45: 

Crossover model, very similar to the G19X but features Gen 5 improvements.

  • G45 MOS: G45 with a cut slide for red dot sights.

    Glock 48: 

  • Compact, single-stack “Slimline” 9x19mm pistol featuring a proprietary 10-round magazine shared with the G43X.
    • G48 MOS: G48 with a cut slide for red dot sights.

10mm Auto

Glock 20: 

Full-size, large-frame, double-stack 10mm Auto pistol featuring a 15-round magazine.

  • G20SF: Short Frame version, featuring a 3mm shorter frame for smaller hands.

Glock 29: 

Subcompact, large-frame, double-stack 10mm Auto pistol featuring a 10-round magazine. Also compatible with G20 magazines.

  • G29SF: Short Frame version, featuring a 3mm shorter frame for smaller hands.

Glock 40 MOS: 

Long-slide version of the G20, sold under its own model number. All Glock 40 pistols feature a cut slide for red dot sights, like other MOS variants.

.380 ACP

Due to the .380 ACP cartridge’s relatively low power, the G25 and G28 pistols use the straight blowback action instead of the standard short-recoil, locked-breech action.

  • Glock 25: Compact, double-stack .380 pistol featuring a 15-round magazine. Not available to civilians in the US due to import restrictions.
  • Glock 28: Subcompact, double-stack .380 pistol featuring a 10-round magazine. Not available to civilians in the US due to import restrictions.
  • Glock 42: Subcompact, single-stack “Slimline” .380 pistol featuring a locked-breech action and a 6-round magazine. The G42 is produced in the US, allowing civilians to purchase it.

.40 S&W

Glock 22:

Full-size, double-stack .40 pistol featuring a 15-round magazine. The G22 is the .40-caliber version of the G17.

  • G22 MOS: Features a cut slide for red dot sights.

Glock 23:

Compact, double-stack .40 pistol featuring a 13-round magazine and compatible with G22 magazines.

  • G23 MOS: Features a cut slide for red dot sights.

Glock 24:

Longslide version of the Glock 22. The G24 is essentially a .40 S&W version of the G17L.

Glock 27:

Subcompact, double-stack .40 pistol featuring a 9-round magazine. Also compatible with G22 and G23 magazines.

Glock 35:

Competition version of the G22, featuring a 5.31” barrel.

  • G35 MOS: G35 with a cut slide for red dot sights.

.357 SIG

Because .357 SIG is a necked-down version of .40 S&W, virtually all .357 SIG models are nearly identical to their .40 S&W counterparts aside from the barrel and chamber.

  • Glock 31: Full-size, double-stack .357 SIG pistol featuring a 15-round magazine. 
  • G31C: Compensated version, featuring a ported slide and barrel.
  • Glock 32: Compact, double-stack .357 SIG pistol featuring a 13-round magazine and compatible with G31 magazines.
  • Glock 33: Subcompact, double-stack .357 SIG pistol featuring a 9-round magazine. Also compatible with G31 and G32 magazines.

.45 ACP

Glock 21: 

Full-size, large-frame, double-stack .45 ACP pistol featuring a 13-round magazine.

  • G21C: Compensated version, featuring a ported slide and barrel.
  • G21SF: Short Frame version, featuring a 3mm shorter frame for smaller hands.

Glock 30: 

Subcompact, large-frame, double-stack .45 ACP pistol featuring a 10-round magazine. Also compatible with G21 magazines.

  • G30SF: Short Frame version, featuring a 3mm shorter frame for smaller hands.
  • G30S: Slim version of the G30, combining the G30SF frame with the G36 slide.

Glock 36: 

Subcompact, single-stack “Slimline” .45 ACP pistol featuring a proprietary 6-round magazine. The first Slimline pistol Glock has ever produced.

Glock 41: 

Competition version of the Glock 21, featuring a 5.31” barrel.

  • G41 MOS: G41 with a cut slide for red dot sights.

.45 GAP

The .45 GAP (Glock Automatic Pistol) cartridge results from a joint venture between CCI/Speer and Glock. The purpose of .45 GAP is to recreate the performance of a .45 ACP in a cartridge short enough to fit in a standard-frame Glock.

  • Glock 37: Full-size, double-stack .45 GAP pistol featuring a 10-round magazine.
  • Glock 38: Compact, double-stack .45 GAP pistol featuring an 8-round magazine. Also compatible with G37 magazines. 
  • Glock 39: Subcompact, double-stack .45 GAP pistol featuring a 6-round magazine. Also compatible with G37 and G38 magazines. 

.22 Long Rifle

  • Glock 44: Compact, single-stack .22 LR pistol featuring a 10-round magazine. The Glock 44 is the first rimfire pistol ever produced by Glock, possessing dimensions similar to a Glock 19.

Eliminate The Confusion With The Right Information

With the correct information at your disposal, navigating the sea of model numbers and designations does not have to be a challenge anymore.